Skip to main content

Make 2019 a Year of Self-Improvement. . .

A final vintage greeting card for the end of the festive season.  This time, an old New Year's card featuring a couple of gnomes in a snowy January landscape.


Happy New Year from all of us at Classic Style!  Hard to believe that it is already 2019.  As I have no doubt remarked elsewhere, it seems like we were just worrying about what all of the coffee makers and toasters might do at midnight on January 1st, 2000!  Terminator in the kitchen, or something like it.  

I recall waking up to a quiet, gray, cold, and snowy morning in Trondheim, Norway that day, somewhat amused at all of the angst and worry about Y2K that had occupied people everywhere in the months before the end of the century.  As the old Doors' tune goes, people are strange.  And it is indeed odd what we get ourselves all worked up about.

But onward into 2019 everyone!  

Let's make this year one for self-improvement.  Keep that aspiration small and modest to make achieving your aim more likely though.  It might be something like increasing your knowledge about subjects that interest you by reading one new book a month.  It might be reducing that waistline by careful diet and exercise.  Say, losing two or three pounds a month.  It might be becoming more informed about the world through reading the daily news in a traditional newspaper, magazines, or online.  Your resolution might, on the other hand, be to polish your table manners a bit.  

Improving yourself might include finally signing off of the perpetual stubble and messy hair look at 35 and making the choice to don creased dress pants, leather loafers, and a sports jacket two or three days a week even if your workplace is t-shirt casual.  Start dressing for the job you want rather than the one you have now in other words.  Double-breasted suits, neckties, and starched white shirts aren't always necessary, but looking more like a capable adult who can make things happen and get things done rather than a drifting 20-something who cannot quite make the leap from part-time college barista to grown-up life -- 'adulting' seems to be the currently popular term -- won't hurt you either, men.

Whatever form your self-improvement might take in the next twelve months, recognize what about yourself might need changing, and have the steely resolve to achieve that change.  While we may not be able to change the world around us, we can certainly change things about ourselves.  Anything is possible, but it all starts with the individual, how that person wants to shape his or her life, and the resulting choices made.

Happy New Year!

-- Heinz-Ulrich

Comments


  1. Usually Blogs lack depth for serious learning. They are good for intellectual entertainment (in a good sense), announcements (again in good sense -- for example announcing some new ideas, new articles, new products), "general interests" reading. Not the case with your post though, really enjoyed it reading it and it held my attention all the way through!

    Read my Latest Post

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

All opinions are welcome here. Even those that differ from mine. But let's keep it clean and civil, please.

-- Heinz-Ulrich

Popular Posts

Avoid Careless Chatter. . .

    E specially about the personal details of our lives.  There is a lot that OUGHT to be kept more private in 2022 than has become the accepted norm for many.  With the conscious and intentional cultivation of classic style in mind, however, we want to avoid oversharing and keep a bit more of ourselves to ourselves.  Exactly what personal information and how much of it to keep private seems to be a slippery concept though.  Here’s my take based on what I was told and observed as a child and young person at home.  Basically, one should keep oneself to oneself in all respects (finances, personal worth, accomplishments, politics, sex, dirty laundry, etc.).  As my late father used to advise when we were very small, and I am talking preschool and kindergarten, there were particular subjects that were not discussed outside the immediate family.  There is a time and place for sharing certain details of one’s life, but most of the time, those should be played very close to the chest,

I Might As Well Be Spring: The Attire for Monday. . .

    C old, blustery, and wet here in Mid-Michigan today although we might possibly have a couple of inches of wet snow at some point.  It just started actually.  Still some limited cross-country skiing up north at one of the Nordic ski centers we like, apparently, but I have not been able to get away for that. But it is springtime according to the calendar.  Attire-wise, I managed to stow the fall and winter stuff and bring out the spring-summer-early fall gear on Saturday.  Always fun to rediscover what you have not thought about in several months. Equally satisfying to discover items that have not ever seen the light of day.  Such is the case for today's shirt from J. Press (hanging in the closet for a year or more) and the necktie, which (hanging on the back of my tie rack, where I keep all of my repp stripe numbers) for 8-10 years.  Imagine that. -- Heinz Ulrich     P.S. Believe it, or not, someone actually just used word "please" (rather than the brusk "Can I ge

A Little Sisterly Advice. . .

    A s promised, my Washington, D.C.-based sister (she lives within walking distance of The National Cathedral) has sent some photographs of one recent combination of items that are pretty typical of her attire for both work and during her off hours.  Without further ado, let's turn things over to my sister for her particular philosophy on how to present oneself in a put-together way regardless of the situation or occasion: As a wardrobe minimalist, and one raised on Ivy Style, every item in my wardrobe has a purpose. Living in the city, and walking almost everywhere, my clothes need to function in an active capacity.  While I have a classic style, it is most often married with functional edgy pieces (boots, skinny jeans, etc.). In the past 15 years, I have gravitated to a neutral color palette for the clothing items in my closet and, at present, my wardrobe is comprised of 65% black items, 15% blue (including denim), 15% grey, with the balance most likely white (shirts, tees, p