Skip to main content

Recrafted Dress Shoes. . .

A package was waiting by the door this afternoon!  My maternal grandfather relied on split-toes and wingtips/brogues for his dress shoes all his adult life until his death ten years ago at 89.  My grandmother followed a year later.  It's funny, but there has not been a day since that I don't think about them.

A couple of years ago when Wisconsin-based shoemaker Allen Edmonds was purchased, there was some concern in the menswear community that it was the start of a long, slow, inevitable decline that would eventually end in cheap, plastic-like shoes being produced in sweatshops outside the U.S. with no customer service to speak of.  

Thus far, that has not happened, and both the company's products and customer service remain second to none.  Very helpful, polite, and professional people on the telephone when you call with a question by the way.  The company pays the return postage too.  Anyway. . .

Today, a pair of split-toe oxfords I purchased cheaply on Ebay a year ago returned home from AE where I sent them just five weeks ago for recrafting.  Like new!  I splurged and opted for the premium package which included new soles, heels, cork footbed, complete refinishing of the leather in its original color, along with AE shoe trees and flannel shoe bags.  They look great, and I'll wear them on the first day o classes in three weeks when the autumn semester begins here at MSU.  Hopefully, the pair of dark chocolate suede wingtips I also sent to AE for similar treatment will turn up in a day or two.

The point of all my shoe blather is this: Purchase quality items when you build your adult wardrobe gents, and not only will they last you a long time, but they can be refurbished, repaired, and will stay looking good for decades as part of your clothing, shoe, and accessory rotation.  Just say "No!" to fast fashion.

-- Heinz-Ulrich



FYI. . .
There are plenty of more expensive men's dress shoes made around the world, but Allen Edmonds are about the friendliest to your wallet, and the company's customer service is, once more, stellar in my experience. 



 And two days later. . . these beauties awaited me at the front door following their complete recrafting by the good folks at the Allen Edmonds factory just outside Milwaukee, Wisconsin.  There is nothing quite like the aroma of (almost) new, quality leather shoes. I wish I had taken a "before" photograph.  It's hard to believe these are the same shoes sent off across Lake Michigan just five weeks ago.  Dare I say it?  I cannot wait for Fall.  These will look super with a tweed sports jacket and a pair of corduroy pants.

Comments

Popular Posts

4th of July Weekend Style. . .

  C aught up outside (all day) yesterday after about two weeks of heavy rains, which prevented much in the way of yardwork.   The lawn is finally bouncing back after several hasty, ragged wet cuts.   Today will see yours truly putting down new mulch among other things.  And preparing our annual 4th of July dinner with a twist of Central North Carolina where my family hails from originally: pork BBQ, red slaw, and hush puppies. We also drink iced tea that has been steeped with mint from our back yard, sweetened of course.   The pork shoulder needs to cook over indirect heat on a grill outside for six hours or more, so it's an all day affair monitoring progress, feeding charcoal briquets to the glowing coals, and basting with an apple cider vinegar-course ground black pepper mix.  I usually do this in and around other tasks like chopping and mixing the slaw along with yardwork outside.   Delicious food, but not kind to the waistline!  So, we do this just a few times a summer and free

The Sunday Papers. . .

  I once knew a dean of something or other when I was a graduate student at The University of Wisconsin-Madison, who restored old radios like these and had two or three working models in his office on campus.  He turned them on for me once.  Nothing sounds quite like these old tube (valve) sets with their large, resonant polished wood cabinets.  An iPhone with earbuds ain't the same thing, folks. This particular illustration turns up here at Classic Style with some regularity, but it conveys perfectly the mood of today's post.  Relaxed.  At ease.  Kind of sleepy.  Definitely not worried about the trials and tribulations of the world for the moment.  My late father used to smoke a pipe during the weekends, and, although I am not a smoker, the aroma of good pipe tobacco is not unpleasant when I detect it on occasion. Ok, magazines rather than a newspaper here, but the expression on his face is priceless.  And many Sunday papers do have a magazine supplement, so it's not that

A Summer Capsule Wardrobe. . .

The sort of items I basically live in when at home from May through September each year until things cool down enough for corduroy jeans and rugby tops. W ithout going crazy, or busting the ol' bank account, it is entirely possible to put together a versatile casual summer wardrobe that will both keep you comfortable AND looking a bit more pulled together than the sad average in 2021.  As my parents used to point out when my sister and I were children and brought home the occasional 'C' on a quarterly report card card from school, "Average is nothing to be excited about.  You can do better than that."  Sharing that sentiment will, no doubt, rile up some readers, but ol' Mom and Dad had a point. Indeed, we can do better than average, even with our casual summer attire.  After all, you only need a few pairs of shorts and a few shirts to mix and match in various combinations that will keep you looking decent without having to put a whole lot of thought into it wh